NARB ProgramBackgrounds

National Advertising Review Board

The National Advertising Review Board (NARB) is the advertising self-regulation industry’s appellate body. Five-member NARB panels hear cases appealing an NAD or CARU decision and provide independent industry peer review, ensuring truthfulness and accuracy in national advertising and helping promote voluntary compliance of its decisions—a key pillar of industry self-regulation.  

Program Impact

NARB, established in 1971 as a fair and impartial appellate body, reviews appealed NAD or CARU decisions. Nominated by various leading organizations in the advertising industry, NARB members are selected for their stature and experience in their fields. 

Truth & Transparency

When a competitor’s advertising harms consumer trust or threatens a company’s reputation and market share, the advertising self-regulatory system creates a level-playing field for business and helps ensure consumers receive truthful and accurate advertising.

Compliance

After a decision, NARB or the challenger can check in on whether the advertiser has made appropriate modifications to its advertising and has 10 days to respond. The case is closed if there is a good faith effort to bring their advertising into compliance.

Non-Compliance

In cases of lack of good faith efforts to modify or discontinue advertising as a result of a NARB decision, NARB will refer the case to an appropriate government agency, usually the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Guidelines & Procedures


Any advertiser or challenger has the right to appeal NAD’s decision to NARB.  An advertiser has an automatic right of appeal. A challenger must request permission to appeal from the NARB chair and explain why it believes there is a substantial likelihood NARB would come to a different conclusion on a case than NAD. 

 

News & Blog

Press Release

BBB National Programs Announces 85 Distinguished Members of 2021 National Advertising Review Board Panel

McLean, VA – January 5, 2021 – BBB National Programs today announced the 2021 Panel Pool Members for its National Advertising Review Board, the appellate body for the U.S. advertising industry’s system of self-regulation. The National Advertising Review Board panel pool members, selected for their stature and experience in their fields,...
Read Press Release
Press Release

BBB National Programs Partners with Facebook to Strengthen Truth-in-Advertising Enforcement on the Social Network's U.S. Platform

New York, NY – December 2, 2020 – Taking an important step to advance the effectiveness of its quick and efficient self-regulatory programs, BBB National Programs today announced a new National Advertising Division (NAD) partnership with Facebook. 

Read the Press Release

After Seven Months, the Verdict is in: Fast-Track SWIFT is Fast and Fair

Nov 19, 2020, 10:55 AM by BBB National Programs
The National Advertising Division (NAD) Fast-Track SWIFT advertising challenge process launched seven months ago as a faster way to resolve single-issue cases. The process has kept its promise of fast and fair decisions. This blog covers lessons learned and best practices gathered by the NAD team since the launch of SWIFT.

The National Advertising Division (NAD) Fast-Track SWIFT (Single Well-defined Issue Fast Track) challenge process, which launched in April of this year was created in response to stakeholders who wanted a faster way to resolve single-issue cases. The process, which was developed in partnership with BBB National Programs stakeholders, is designed to be fast, but fair. Decisions are made public monthly, and to date every case has been resolved within the promised 20-business day timeline, with the average time to close at ten business days.

Ideal SWIFT cases are single well-defined advertising issues that rest on simple advertising principles and have uncomplicated evidence. In May, Laura Brett, Vice President of NAD, spoke with Loeb & Loeb’s David Mallen about the process and answered questions from the legal community about how the process was designed to work. 

Though SWIFT accepts challenges to the prominence or sufficiency of disclosures (including influencer marketing, native advertising, and incentivized reviews) and misleading pricing and sales claims, all but one of the twelve closed SWIFT challenges so far, however, belong to the final SWIFT category, misleading express claims. 

When the challenge is filed, NAD conducts an initial review and if the advertiser chooses to file an objection that the challenge is too complicated to be determined in the SWIFT process, the NAD team will conduct a second review. These gatekeeping features ensure that only appropriate cases remain in SWIFT. Three challenges have included such an objection, and two SWIFT cases have been transferred to Standard track

In addition, initiating a SWIFT case may also encourage settlements between parties, as two cases have been closed within days of filing by consent of the parties. 

While well-suited for digital advertising, SWIFT challenges run the gamut of advertising media and product categories. In the last six months we have seen SWIFT cases for telecom television commercials, infant formula labels, Google Ads search results for energy bars, the provenance of custom kitchen designs, disclosures for dietary supplements, security system claims, and online Wi-Fi coverage maps. 

Another finding in these six months of working through SWIFT cases is the opportunity to raise important issues and provide useful, but carefully tailored, guidance to advertisers. 

One challenge involved Google Ads returning the top result “A Better Performing Bar | Clif Bars for Sustained Energy” in response to a search for “Kind bars.” NAD determined that in this context it is expressly stated that Clif bars provided better (as in superior) “sustained energy” performance compared to Kind bars. NAD further determined that a comparison of the ingredients in each product was insufficient to support the superior performance claim. In recommending that the claim be discontinued, NAD limited its recommendation to the Google Ads search results. 

Another SWIFT case focused on the claim “#1 Pediatrician Recommended Brands *Based on Combined Recommendations of Similac and EleCare,” which appeared in social media. Although the claim appeared on Similac cow’s milk infant formulas, the basis for the #1 claim for Similac included pediatric recommendations for Elecare, a small amino-acid formula brand for infants with protein allergies. 

The survey evidence – the reliability of which was not contested – maintained that the #1 claim was based on recommendations in the “combined Infant Formula/Amino Acids category.” NAD determined that the claim was not a good fit for the advertiser’s evidence because the basis for the #1 claim was not understandable and recommended that it be discontinued.  

As the Clif and Similac cases suggest, companies must weigh the desire for a speedy resolution versus a more expansive decision. Both SWIFT decisions thoroughly analyzed the challenged advertising quickly, the speed of which was certainly valuable to the parties. However, if they had proceeded in standard track, NAD would have likely provided guidance on whether Clif bar’s “sustained energy” claim was supported in other contexts, or whether combing data for traditional and amino-acid infant formulas was consumer relevant. 

SWIFT is one of NAD’s three case choice options that provide companies with more flexibility and greater transparency into the advertising self-regulatory process. One of the benefits of NAD’s self-regulatory process has always been the quick time-to-resolution, when compared to litigation. SWIFT is raising that bar, and with the launch of Complex Track in August, we are further acknowledging that every case is unique and those voluntarily bringing cases to NAD and choosing self-regulation need choices. 

 

 

 

Decisions

Decision

NARB Recommends Comcast Discontinue or Modify “Best In-Home WiFi Experience” Claim and Discontinue its “Roommate” Commercial

A panel of the National Advertising Review Board (NARB), the appellate advertising law body of BBB National Programs, has recommended that Comcast Cable Communications, LLC d

Read Decision
Decision

NARB Refers Health-Related Claims for Theraworx Relief for Muscle and Joint Products to the FTC

New York, NY – January 12, 2021 – A panel of the National Advertising Review Board (NARB) has referred advertising claims made by Avadim Health, Inc. to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for review and possible enforcement action. The referral comes after the company declined to comply with a NARB recommendation to discontinue unsupported...

Read Decision
Decision

NAD Recommends L’Oréal Discontinue “#1 Dermatologist Recommended” Claim for CeraVe; Advertiser to Appeal

The National Advertising Division (NAD) recommended that L’Oréal USA discontinue claims that CeraVe is the “#1 dermatologist recommended skincare brand” and that it is the “#1 recommended non-OTC moisturizer for acne-prone skin.” 

Read Decision
Decision

NAD Recommends Zarbee’s Inc. Qualify Use of the Term “Natural” in its Brand-Name for Some of its Dietary Supplement Products, and Modify Additional Claims

New York, NY – January 7, 2021 – The National Advertising Division (NAD) recommended that Zarbee’s qualify its use of the term “natural” in the Zarbee’s Naturals brand name when some or all the essential or key ingredients used in its products are not naturally derived. NAD also...

Read Decision

 

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

 

 

 

Contact Us

*Required fields